Wellington City Council Verbal Submission

I made the following submission on the Council’s Draft Long Term Plan. Some of this related to FLOSS. This was a 3 minute slot with 2 minutes for questions from the councillors.

Introduction

I have been a Wellington inhabitant for 22 years and am a business owner. We employ about 140 staff in Wellington, with offices in Christchurch, Sydney, Brisbane and the UK. I am also co-chair of NZRise which represents NZ owned IT businesses.

I have 3 Points to make in 3 minutes.

1. The Long Term plan lacks vision and is a plan for stagnation and erosion

It focuses on selling assets, such as community halls and council operations and postponing investments. On reducing public services such as libraries and museums and increasing user costs. This will not create a city where “talent wants to live”. With this plan who would have thought the citizens of the city had elected a Green Mayor?

Money speaks louder than words. Both borrowing levels and proposed rate increases are minimal and show a lack of investment in the city, its inhabitants and our future.

My company is about to open an office in Auckland. A manager was recently surveying staff about team allocation and noted, as an aside, that between 10 and 20 Wellington staff would move to Auckland given the opportunity. We are not simply competing with Australia for hearts and minds, we are competing with Auckland whose plans for investment are much higher than our own.

2. Show faith in local companies

The best way to encourage economic growth is to show faith in the talent that actually lives here and pays your rates. This means making sure the council staff have a strong direction and mandate to procure locally. In particular the procurement process needs to be overhauled to make sure it does not exclude SME’s (our backbone) from bidding for work (see this NZCS story). It needs to be streamlined, transparent and efficient.

A way of achieving local company participation in this is through disaggregation – the breaking up large-scale initiatives into smaller, more manageable components. For the following reasons:

  • It improves project success rates, which helps the public sector be more effective.
  • It reduces project cost, which benefits the taxpayers.
  • It invites small business, which stimulates the economy.

3. Smart cities are open source cities

Use open source software as the default.

It has been clear for a long time that open source software is the most cost effective way to deliver IT services. It works for Amazon, Facebook, Red Hat and Google and just about every major Silicon Valley success since the advent of the internet. Open source drives the internet and these companies because it has an infinitely scalable licensing and model – free. Studies, such as the one I have here from the London School of Economics, show the cost effectiveness and innovation that comes with open source.

It pains me to hear about proposals to save money by reducing libraries hours and increasing fees, when the amount of money being saved is less than the annual software licence fees our libraries pay, when world beating free alternatives exist.

This has to change, looking round the globe it is the visionary and successful local councils that are mandating the use of FLOSS, from Munich to Vancouver to Raleigh NC to Paris to San Francisco.

As well as saving money, open source brings a state of mind. That is:

  • Willingness to share and collaborate
  • Willingness to receive information
  • The right attitude to be innovative, creative, and try new things

Thank you. There should now be 2 minutes left for questions.

Share this article:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • E-mail this story to a friend!
  • Identi.ca
  • Reddit
  • Scoopit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter